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BIAS IN THE HIRING DECISION

 

Many organizations have regretted the hiring decisions that they have made in the past.  There are significant downfalls to an organization for hiring the wrong people for the job that they were hired for, often times a drain on the organization’s bottom line.  They include:

  • Employee disengagement
  • Lack of creativity and innovation
  • Inability to develop an effective succession plan
  • High turnover

We all know how costly these situations can be.

Since the recession, America has seen a flooded candidate pool, yet companies continue struggling with poor hiring decisions.  Why are we unable to make the best hiring decisions?  The answer is BIAS.  Attracting candidates has become much easier, but screening out those that didn’t meet the needs and culture of a particular organization is a much more difficult task.  This challenge required is that we must look at each key position objectively and eliminate any bias that keeps us from hiring the very best candidates for that position.

As Steven Covey, the Management Guru, stated, “We see the world from our eyes, not as it really is.”  All of us are influenced by how we value experience, knowledge, economics, aesthetics, altruism, power and transition.  When we interview a person who sees the world differently than us, bias can play an unknowingly important role in our decision making process.  Neither right or wrong, nor good or bad, biases are simply a reflection of our own personal viewpoint.  Oftentimes this personal viewpoint is unknowingly injected into the hiring process even when it is totally irrelevant to a specific position or even the organization itself, creating a barrier that may prevent us from selecting those truly superior performers. 

Although laws keep us from acting on our own biases as they relate to gender, age, nationality and sexual orientation, there are still personal biases that enter into the decision making process.  Other biases that hinder our decision making process are experience, education and intelligence.  However, people bring other talents to the job including their passions, beliefs, personal skills and behaviors that can mean the right talent in the right jobs can make or break an organization, even when the product offers some of the brightest stars available.

We have found that one of the most important skills is personal accountability.  Most organizations do not have an awareness of its importance, nor a way to quantitatively measure it.

Effectively measuring a prospective candidate’s behaviors, motivators, personal skills and acumen necessary for a particular position can help your organization attain its full potential.

The good and the bad news for Connecticut business

 

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The good news for Connecticut businesses is, the recession is easing.  The bad news is, people who have stayed in their jobs throughout the bad economy due to economic fears of losing their incomes and not being able to support their families, and those that felt they were maltreated during the recession, are polishing up their resumes.  Some experts believe that up to 80% of American workers are thinking about or are actually seeking new jobs.  The negative impact to many companies may be considerable.  From what we have seen in the past six months, employers have begun to implement programs to retain some of their most talented and key employees, including executives, managers, future leader and those who work on the front lines.

As turnover is rapidly increasing, many employers are preparing for additional employee turnover in the coming year.  Once employers recognize that if key employee retention is a problem, even with an unemployment rate still hovering at 8%, the situation will intensify when more jobs become available in the marketplace as the economy continues to improve.  Astute employers will implement those actions necessary to retain their key talent.

According to a survey completed OI Partners in Hartford:

  • 90% of employers are concerned about turnover of high-potential employees
  • 72% are concerned about losing sales and service employees
  • 60% worry about middle-management turnover
  • 45% are concerned about losing their senior level executives

Workers with the highest rates of turnover include operations and production workers, sales and marketing personnel, accounting and finance staff and information services.

Companies need to implement training programs, business coaching, enhanced benefits, financial incentives and well thought out succession plans, sooner rather than later to retain their top talent.

For those companies that will be filling vacated positions, it will be even more imperative that they hire “the right people for the right jobs” so that new employees’ cultural fit and learning curves will be greatly enhanced.

Don't let your organization's workforce become your competitors' "catch of the day."  Be prepared, don’t let this inevitable scenario erode your bottom line.

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Gratitude FROM client and TOWARD client-Business Coaching to the next level.

 

We, as business coaches and mentors always need to remember that we often find ourselves having to be much more.  It is too easy to forget, especially when implementing a proven methodology and/or process, that in order to be a  great coach and mentor, we always need to make sure that the bi-product deliverales-CONFIDENCE-MOTIVATION-INSPIRARTION are always delivered...not just in every meeting, but in every minute of every meeting. 

A client just sent me this casual email that served as an awesome reminder to me:

Subject: Thanks

"Just wanted to thank you again not only for lunch yesterday, but for all the help and support you have given me up to this point."

"While I am grateful for The Birch Group's help as a whole, and the institutional support they offer in support of you...the real value is in your company/individual expertise, passion and guidance."

 "If you ever need a favor, professional or otherwise, please don't hesitate to ask."

"Now that I'm stabilized and nearly 'tooled and ready', I'm looking forward to working with you in a different capacity moving forward.  Thanks again."

JW [CLIENT]

 

MOTIVATORS “Lack of advancement negates professional development”-NOW I HAVE HEARD EVERYTHING

 

http://news-releases.uiowa.edu/2011/june/061011employee_turnover.html


University of Iowa study finds employee training might actually increase turnover-

--“Lack of advancement opportunities negates benefits of professional development programs.”

Please follow the hyperlink to an article referring to a study from June 2011 at the University of Iowa.  Just when you thought you heard everything…  Although it is true that if an employee does not see any career advancement opportunities in the organization, and the market place for new employees changes dramatically from the buyer’s market it is today, then employees will start picking their heads up and testing the marketplace.  However in this marketplace, not many are looking to be the new person on the bottom rung in an organization. 

When the economy shifts, any training, development and learning that employees received will be remembered and appreciated and should create new opportunities in the existing organization which ideally lines up with the newly acquired skills and better developed employees.  
 

First of all, let us not forget that it was not employees who started the unbelievable lack of loyalty to their employers, it was the other was around.  Call it right sizing, off-shoring, outsourcing, laying off…whatever you want.  To me it is a lack of company loyalty and employees paying for bad business decisions made by employers.  One of the fantastic changes that is coming out of this development, the genx ers and a lousy economy is that diversity, learning and development are really becoming important components of our compensations plans.  This is fantastic. 


To say that people would leave because they have no career opportunities is not a stretch at all, as a matter of fact, it is so obvious I am not sure why we call it a “finding in a study”.  Aren’t the professional development programs designed to, among other things, provide new opportunities for growth within companies and organizations.


Furthermore, please let’s not forget that I can find studies that I would actually call “studies” that prove GenY ers are more motivated by learning and professional development that from Salary.  They still will need opportunity for growth of course.  That takes care of itself.  The motivated GenX ers, while they are seeking work and life balance, will develop and market their growing value propositions to the existing companies.  Employees who did not grow and develop and take advantage of company offerings will lose opportunity and attrition out.  Wallah-growth opportunities for fully developed genx ers who are familiar with and comfortable with their changing and growing value proposition.  Who benefits?  The company, the employees, the customers, the vendors and the shareholders.  Who loses? The companies that do not pay for learning and development and the employees too lazy to take advantage of these offerings.


It has been proven that professional development costs usually return something like 500% ROI.  I guess that is only if you do NOT work at University of Iowa.

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